Sculpture

Wheelbarrow exhibited at SAMMLUNG VERBUND gallery, exhibition SIX DECADES, Vienna, 2023

Following her performanceSe vendre sur les marchés en petits morceaux , ORLAN exhibited the wheelbarrow she had used. This performance consisted of selling black-and-white photographs of her body parts glued to wood and detoured, propelled on a cart through a vegetable market, like a foodstuff alongside stalls of carrots, leeks and potatoes…

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ORLAN & ORLNADOÏDE, Artistic, electronic and verbal striptease, exhibition Artistes et Robots Grand Palais, Paris, 2018

ORLAN created ORLANoide, a work in progress, in 2018 as part of the Artistes et Robots exhibition at the Grand Palais curated by Laurence Bertrand Dorléac and Jérôme Neutres. It’s a humanoid robot with ORLAN’s face, endowed with artificial intelligence as well as collective and social intelligence.

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A grand cru reinvented, 2016, La Source – Annonay

ORLAN creates Un grand cru réinventé as part of a charity project for Gérard Garouste’s La Source. ORLAN covers a wine bottle with a silver cover, on which she pastes a photograph of the 4th Operation-Surgery-Performance, known as Operation Successful. In this image, the artist is shown eating real and fake grapes before the operation. She adds plastic grapes to crown the bottle in reference to her performance.

Shifting Folds, 2012

ORLAN’s draped works seem to come from the Victory of Samothrace, which ORLAN saw on the walls of her school from an early age, to Bernini’s Baroque folds. For ORLAN, she is an extraordinary example of strength and dynamism. In 2012, the artist created a series called Plis Mouvants, featuring computer-generated Baroque drapery in the continuity of her Étude Documentaire. This series of 36 works was produced as a lenticular print, creating movement and changing the folds as the viewer positions them. ORLAN uses organic references to the moving, twisting body and female sex.

Differences and Repetitions, Bodiless Garment: Fold Sculpture, 2010

These four sculptures of folds follow in the footsteps of ORLAN’s work on Baroque drapery. Indeed, since the 1980s, ORLAN, draped in skilful folds, has been in dialogue with art history, and Bernini’s statuary in particular. 

For her exhibition at Abbaye de Maubuisson in 2009, ORLAN created this new series. When nuns took holy orders, often in spite of themselves, in this abbey, they had to accept the law of silence and lose their bodies and their pleasures.

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An ORLAN-BODY of skulls, 2009

In 2009, ORLAN designed a very contemporary vanity entitled Un ORLAN-Corps de crâne. To create this work, the artist went to the Clinique de Turin in Paris to have her skull scanned. This work was produced using software developed by the Sismos design group and linked to a 3D printer. As it happens, the X-rays that were taken, scheduled solely for the purpose of making a work of art, enabled the doctors to detect a very serious infection in her sinuses, so she was able to get treatment in time. Art is therapeutic.

Bump-Load Series: Luminous Sculpting Brushes Version 2, 2009

ORLAN, who has often used her own body as material for her work, has designed an interactive sculpture in which she hybridizes her body with that of an African woman. This work is part of the African self-hybridization movement.

The sculpture is made of resin and contains coltan atoms on a luminous fiber-optic base. ORLAN questions the dangerousness of the African sound from which coltan is extracted. This mutant being is somewhere between techno-cyber and ethno-futurism. 

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Bodiless Garment: Fold Sculpture, 2002

It’s been said that baroque was classicism’s monster, and that women were man’s monster! Baroque’s detractors say it’s in very bad taste, that it’s “too much”. 

In 1980, ORLAN travelled to Italy to study the Baroque and understand this aversion. This study trip enabled him to identify works of great importance in the history of art. The Baroque has been a major source of inspiration for ORLAN, who has  worked on this theme for over ten years in her major series Etude Documentaire: le Drapé-le Baroque.

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ORLAN has been reading a lot since she was very young. It was one of his first openings to the world and to his emancipation. ORLAN creates two black and white photographic series. In the first, Littérature pour se tenir bien droite, ORLAN shows herself with piles of books she had in her studio.

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ORLAN-CORPS (measuring instrument), 2002

ORLAN has created a new measuring instrument: the ORLAN-CORPS. ORLAN has used this object during her MesuRAGES performances to measure streets named after historic stars (most of whom, of course, are men, with a few rare exceptions) and to measure cultural institutions such as the Guggenheim (Spain), the usée Saint-Pierre des Beaux-arts in Lyon, the Centre Georges Pompidou (France), the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburg (USA) and the M HKA in Antwerp (Belgium). ORLAN also measured the Le Corbusier unit in Firminy and the Vatican.

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Defiguration-Refiguration, African Self-Hybridations, 2000

A year after her first series of Pre-Columbian Self-hybridations, ORLAN continues her reflection on non-Western beauty standards with the creation of the African Self-hybridations series, in memory of all the exciting study trips to Africa that so marked her youth.

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Espace Lyonnais d’art contemporain, 1980, Documentary Study: Le Drapé-le Baroque. Elevated Chapel to My beloved-self (Staging for a saint)

ORLAN creates a resin statue of Saint ORLAN with beautiful drapery, a single bare breast and a finger raised to the sky for her installation La Chapelle élevée à moi-même(mise en scène for a Saint). It condenses various aspects of the artist’s reflections on the Baroque into an extravagant sensory installation. Built for the Made in France exhibition at the Espace lyonnais d’art contemporain, the monumental chapel measured 10m².

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ORLAN-CORPS holds up the rinsing liquid, Effigy, 1980

This work consists of an effigy of ORLAN brandishing the MesuRAGEs rinsing liquid. It’s a black-and-white photo glued to wood and cropped.

The MesuRAGEs protocol is very precise: ORLAN puts on a dress made from the sheets of her trousseau, always the same until it wears out, complete or almost.

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ORLAN as guardian of the ORLAN-BODY, 1980

This work is composed of two effigies of ORLAN on pedestals, each bearing an ORLAN-CORPS. It’s a black-and-white photo of her body glued to wood and cropped to scale 1 ORLAN-CORPS is a unit of measurement ORLAN created for the MesuRAGEs. ORLAN’s effigy shown wearing the MesuRAGEs dress made of trousseau sheets.  

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Documentary Study : Le Drapé-le Baroque : Bust in marble of ORLAN in Saint-ORLAN, 1978

It’s been said that baroque was classicism’s monster, and that women were man’s monster! Baroque’s detractors say it’s in very bad taste, that it’s “too much”. 

In 1980, ORLAN travelled to Italy to study the Baroque and understand this aversion. This study trip enabled him to identify works of great importance in the history of art. The Baroque has been a major source of inspiration for ORLAN, who has  worked on this theme for over ten years in her major series Etude Documentaire: le Drapé-le Baroque.

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The marble sculpture entitledÉtude documentaire : Le Drapé-le Baroque depicts a bust of ORLAN as Sainte-ORLAN, dressed as a Madonna with the sheets from her trousseau.

ORLAN has created many sculptures, using a wide variety of materials and techniques: resin, kraft paper, Carrara marble, 3D printing…

She has long been interested in the Baroque and has produced numerous documentary studies. 

 

Kiss of the Artist, 1977

Le baiser de l’Artiste (1977) is a large sculpture featuring a black-painted pedestal. On one side stands ORLAN’s life-size effigy in black and white photo, disguised and draped as a Madonna. 

For 5 francs, candles could be placed at Sainte-ORLAN.

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MeasuRAGE’s Dresses

This is the dress ORLAN wore during her MesuRAGEs performances, during which she followed a precise protocol. She puts on a dress made from the sheets of her trousseau, always the same until it wears out, complete or almost. After measuring the space determined by her body by lying on the floor and drawing a chalk line behind her head, and then counting the number of times her body is contained within this space using her unit of measurement the ORLAN-CORPS, she fetches water, removes her dress, washes it in public and collects the dirty water from the dress in a flask with which she poses like the Statue of Liberty. 

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The birth of ORLAN without shell, Paris, France, 1974

This work features an ORLAN effigy revisiting Sandro Botticelli’s famous painting The Birth of Venus (1484-1485), but without the shell.

ORLAN is naked, the shell represented by a pile of post-striptease trousseau sheets, like a solid chrysalis from which we don’t know what body will be born.

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